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Mansour Salsabili

Mansour Salsabili

Associate, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom

Contact:
Email: mansour_salsabili@hks.harvard.edu

 

Experience

Mansour Salsabili is a visiting scholar at the MIT Center for International Studies where he conducts research on establishing a WMD-free zone in the Middle East.

He is also a former Iranian diplomat who participated in different aspects of the work of the United Nations (UN) in New York from UN reforms to the Non-Aligned Movement and also was a disarmament expert dealing with the Conference on Disarmament at the European office of the UN in Geneva. He followed disarmament and international security issues in cooperation with a range of research institutes such as the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) and also the United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research (UNIDIR) and taught a limited number of courses on International Relations and Foreign Policy of Iran at the University of Tarbiat Moddarress, in Tehran.

Prior to that, Salsabili contributed to the Hamshahri newspaper on international and particularly Middle East events. He was director of research and also a member of the editorial board of the Middle East History Research Institute (MEHRI) in Tehran. There, he had scores of contributions to three volumes of the encyclopaedic work of the Chronicle of the Middle East Contemporary History, the first volume of which—covering events of 1800–1850—was published in 1991.

He received his Ph.D. in Middle East politics from the University of Exeter in 1999.

 

 

By Date

 

2014

Wikimedia Commons

March 16, 2014

"Leave Iran's Missiles Out of Nuclear Talks"

Op-Ed, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

By Mansour Salsabili, Associate, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom

'...[T]he missile program is an outgrowth of legitimate defensive needs. Historically it is a remnant of two things that occurred during the 1980-1988 Iran-Iraq war: the Iraqi use of Scud missiles against Iranian cities, and the US arms embargo. During the war, the Iranian air defense system had the ability to intercept Iraqi airplanes and warn of their imminent attacks. Iraq’s long range-missiles, however, could escape such interception. Hence Iraqi missile strikes had the effect of surprise, large-scale terrorist attacks on major urban centers."

 

2013

Wikimedia Commons

July 19, 2013

"Sequencing is Key"

Op-Ed, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

By Mansour Salsabili, Associate, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom

"The process might still move forward if the Middle East were conceived of as three subregions: the Arab Maghreb (North Africa excluding Egypt); Israel and its immediate area; and the Persian Gulf. Such an approach—which would not replace but rather complement existing efforts to eliminate WMD—would enjoy three practical advantages. Diplomatic obstacles in each subregion would be minimized because a limited number of countries would be involved; neighboring countries' common interests would make trade-offs possible; and ambiguity and obfuscation would become more difficult."

 

 

June 24, 2013

"Where Realism Fails"

Op-Ed, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

By Mansour Salsabili, Associate, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom

"A warning sign came on April 29 when Egypt's delegation walked out of a preparatory committee meeting for the 2015 Review Conference for the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. But that is only a small indication of the frustration that parties in the Middle East feel about the cancellation of the 2012 conference. The frustration is likely to become more obvious as nations coordinate their approaches to the 2015 Review Conference."

 

 

ILPI

June 21, 2013

"Fixing a Process in Jeopardy"

Op-Ed, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

By Mansour Salsabili, Associate, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom

"The cancellation of the 2012 Middle East WMD-Free Zone Conference is not the end of the world. But it could have poisonous effects on policy at the national, regional, and international levels."

 

 

March 2013

"Iran and Weapons of Mass Destruction: The Military Dynamics of Nonproliferation"

Discussion Paper

By Mansour Salsabili, Associate, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom

Ambiguity in Iran's weapon acquisition dynamics exacerbates mistrust, which is the core reason for the present standoff at the negotiating table. This paper elucidates the Iranian military's capability and intention by delving into the main componential elements of weapon acquisition.

 

2012

AP Photo

May 24, 2012

"US Should Not Continue to Insist on Sanctions against Iran"

Op-Ed, GlobalPost

By Mansour Salsabili, Associate, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom

"Here the vital task is clarifying and resolving in this case the inherent tension between the Non-Proliferation Treaty's prohibition on proliferation and provision of the right to nuclear energy. This is not an easy job."

 

 

AP Photo

April 13, 2012

"Iran Talks: Why Time is Ripe for Compromise"

Op-Ed, Christian Science Monitor

By Mansour Salsabili, Associate, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom

The opportunity for a compromise on nuclear and other regional issues between Iran and the United States has never been so ripe as now, when talks resume between Iran and international negotiators in Istanbul this weekend. The desire for progress on both sides of the table is observable. What can ensure a tangible result?

 

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