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Scott Moore

Mailing address

Rubenstein 503
79 John F. Kennedy Street
Mailbox 81
Cambridge, MA, 02138

Scott Moore

Giorgio Ruffolo Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Sustainability Science Program/Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group

Contact:
Telephone: 617-384-5737
Email: scott_moore@hks.harvard.edu

 

Experience

Scott Moore is a joint Giorgio Ruffolo Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Sustainability Science Program and the Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group. He received his D.Phil. in Politics at Oxford University. His research focuses on international environmental politics and policy, with a topical focus on water resources, energy and climate change, and marine issues and a regional focus on China and India.

Scott's academic background is in political and environmental science, and he has a long-standing interest in China, where he previously worked with the U.S. Department of Energy. At HKS, he will complete an overview of water resource politics in China, and as a Rhodes and Truman Scholar, aspires to a career bridging both scholarship and public service.

 

 

By Date

 

2014

August 2014

"Hydropolitics and Inter-Jurisdictional Relationships in China: The Pursuit of Localized Preferences in a Centralized System"

Journal Article, The China Quarterly, volume 218

By Scott Moore, Giorgio Ruffolo Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Sustainability Science Program/Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group

Inter-jurisdictional water resource issues constitute a growing political and economic challenge in China. This article examines three such cases of hydropolitics, namely large dam construction, water resource allocation, and downstream water pollution, through the lens of central–local relations. It argues that the hydropolitics in China are characterized by the pursuit of localized preferences within the constraints imposed by a centralized political system.

 

 

Wikimedia Commons CC

June 11, 2014

"Pollution Without Revolution"

Journal Article, Foreign Affairs

By Scott Moore, Giorgio Ruffolo Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Sustainability Science Program/Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group

"Given Beijing's new emphasis on the environment, an even bigger challenge will be addressing the global dimensions of its pollution, the effects of which don't stop at the water's edge. China is by far the largest source of air pollution among all Asian countries, including India, and Chinese emissions negatively affect air quality in a host of neighboring countries, particularly Japan. Chinese air pollution is even degrading air quality in the United States."

 

 

Wikimedia CC

March 2014

"Why China Needs New Institutions to Cope with Looming Water Scarcity"

Policy Brief

By Scott Moore, Giorgio Ruffolo Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Sustainability Science Program/Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group

This brief looks at the so-far inadequate responses of the Chinese government and makes the case that new institutions are needed to allow China to meet this growing challenge.

 

 

High Contrast Photo CC

March 11, 2014

"The United States of China"

Op-Ed, New York Times

By Scott Moore, Giorgio Ruffolo Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Sustainability Science Program/Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group

"But adopting federalism would help to ease one of modern China's most fundamental governance problems: The fact that local officials often implement central policies halfheartedly, if at all. Caught in a system that gives them plenty of responsibilities but no accountability to constituents, China's local officials emphasize short-term economic growth over compliance with directives like antipollution and social welfare targets. The result is that environmental and social policies are often badly implemented. If provincial and local officials had a greater voice in developing policy, they would have a greater stake in the outcome of these policies."

 

 

February 2014

The Politics of Thirst

Discussion Paper

By Scott Moore, Giorgio Ruffolo Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Sustainability Science Program/Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group

Northern China's Yellow River is experiencing conditions of acute water scarcity, which has become an issue of growing concern to scholars, policymakers, and the public at large in both China and abroad. This Discussion Paper analyzes the current and future response of the Chinese government to conditions of water scarcity in the Yellow River Basin.

 

2013

November 19, 2013

"China Must Strengthen its Institutions Before Unleashing Market Forces"

Op-Ed, The South China Morning Post

By Scott Moore, Giorgio Ruffolo Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Sustainability Science Program/Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group

"Although the country has successfully imported model environmental policies, it has yet to develop the complex institutional infrastructure needed to make them work, especially an independent judiciary, a capable bureaucracy, and effective co-operation between central and local governments."

 

 

Joe Mabel Photo

October 8, 2013

"California's Sub-National Diplomacy: The Right Approach"

Op-Ed, Power & Policy Blog

By Scott Moore, Giorgio Ruffolo Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Sustainability Science Program/Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group

"Sub-national partnerships have the advantage of being far more flexible than nation-to-nation agreements. This makes it easier to target specific needs across national borders, such as the improbable but promising partnership between the port cities of Seattle and Dalian to clean up their harbors. Sub-national agreements are also better suited to policy innovation and the tackling of tough issues like climate change, because the stakes are much lower than at the international level. Consequently, sub-national agreements are particularly well-suited to deal with environmental issues."

 

 

USACE Photo

September 30, 2013

"Cooperation, Not Litigation, Best for Managing Water Resources"

Op-Ed, Orlando Sentinel

By Scott Moore, Giorgio Ruffolo Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Sustainability Science Program/Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group

"Two recent Supreme Court decisions, including one concerning a Florida water-management district, threaten to undermine state and federal officials' ability to manage America's water resources. Instead of fighting it out through the courts, the governor should work with neighboring states and the federal government to use economic measures to ensure more efficient use of water resources."

 

 

May/June 2013

"Good Service"

Op-Ed, Foreign Affairs

By Scott Moore, Giorgio Ruffolo Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Sustainability Science Program/Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group

"...Stanley McChrystal, the retired U.S. general, argued that the United States should compel all Americans to serve their country through some form of national service. Conscription, however, is not the answer to the United States’ challenges at home or abroad. Instead, Washington should build on the success of existing voluntary programs, such as the Peace Corps, to give more Americans the opportunity to advance U.S. foreign policy objectives by serving abroad."

 

 

May 3, 2013

"Calming the West's Water Wars"

Op-Ed, Los Angeles Times

By Scott Moore, Giorgio Ruffolo Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Sustainability Science Program/Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group

"The president and Congress, despite the political and organizational barriers, can nonetheless take steps to help end America's water wars. First, Congress should restore funding for the U.S. Water Resources Council and the regional River Basin Commissions. Before they were de-funded during the Reagan administration, these bodies served as focal points for water policy and as useful platforms for dialogue between states and the federal government. By fostering sustained, structured communication among Washington and the states themselves, they can help prevent disputes from arising in the first place."

 

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