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Joern Huenteler

Joern Huenteler

Former Associate, Energy Technology Innovation Policy (ETIP) research group, 2015–2016; Former Research Fellow, ETIP, 2013–2015

 

Experience

Former Associate, Energy Technology Innovation Policy (ETIP) research group, 2015–2016; Former Research Fellow, ETIP, 2013–2015

Current Affiliation: Energy Specialist, Energy & Extractives Global Practice, Middle East & North Africa Region, World Bank, Washington, D.C.

 

 

By Date

 

2015

In Press

"Technology Life-cycles in the Energy Sector — Technological Characteristics and the Role of Deployment for Innovation"

Journal Article, Technological Forecasting and Social Change

By Joern Huenteler, Former Associate, Energy Technology Innovation Policy (ETIP) research group, 2015–2016; Former Research Fellow, ETIP, 2013–2015, Tobias S Schmidt, Jan Ossenbrink and Volker H. Hoffmann

Understanding the long-term patterns of innovation in energy technologies is crucial for technology forecasting and public policy planning in the context of climate change. This paper analyzes which of two common models of innovation over the technology life-cycle — the product-process innovation shift observed for mass-produced goods or the system-component shift observed for complex products and systems — best describes the pattern of innovation in energy technologies.

 

 

August 2015

Energy Technology Innovation Policy in the Backdrop of the U.S.-China Emissions Agreement

Report

By Christian Binz, Former Associate, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, 2015–2016; Former Research Fellow, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, 2014–2015, Gabe Chan, Former Research Fellow, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, 2012–2015, Claudia Doblinger, Former Associate, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program (STPP)/Energy Technology Innovation Policy (ETIP) research group; 2015–2016; Former Research Fellow, STPP/ETIP, 2014–2015, Joern Huenteler, Former Associate, Energy Technology Innovation Policy (ETIP) research group, 2015–2016; Former Research Fellow, ETIP, 2013–2015, Dongbo Shi, Former Research Fellow, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program, 2014–2015, Tian Tang, Former Giorgio Ruffolo Doctoral Research Fellow, Sustainability Science Program/Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, 2014–2015, Lei Xu, Former Research Fellow, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program/Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, 2014–2015 and Laura Diaz Anadon, Associate, Environment and Natural Resources Program

The Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group at the Harvard Kennedy School and the Tsinghua School of Public Policy and Management convened a workshop at Tsinghua University in Beijing on June 18–19, 2015 to build on the momentum created by the U.S.-China joint emissions agreement and the upcoming Paris negotiations. The objective of the Workshop was to discuss the current state of affairs in China, in the United States, and in selected other countries as well as academic research on: (1) the funding and allocation of government investments in R&D, with a particular focus in energy; (2) the impact of policy on private sector innovation in energy; and (3) the management of publicly funded R&D organizations.

 

 

June 2015

"The Future of Low-Carbon Road Transport: What Role for Second-Generation Biofuels?"

Rapporteur's Report

By Joern Huenteler, Former Associate, Energy Technology Innovation Policy (ETIP) research group, 2015–2016; Former Research Fellow, ETIP, 2013–2015 and Henry Lee, Director, Environment and Natural Resources Program

The promise, prospects, and public policy trade-offs related to second-generation biofuels in road transport were addressed in an executive session convened at The Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Michigan, on April 7 and 8, 2015. The workshop brought together twenty-eight of the world's leading experts from the fields of policy, science, and business for an intensive two-day session. This report is a summary of the main points and issues raised over the two days. It has been reviewed by all the participants. The summary is intended to reflect the breadth of the discussion, rather than to suggest any form of overall consensus among the participants.

 

 

November 13-14, 2014

"Commercializing Second-Generation Biofuels: Scaling Up Sustainable Supply Chains and the Role of Public Policy"

Rapporteur's Report

By Joern Huenteler, Former Associate, Energy Technology Innovation Policy (ETIP) research group, 2015–2016; Former Research Fellow, ETIP, 2013–2015, Laura Diaz Anadon, Associate, Environment and Natural Resources Program, Henry Lee, Director, Environment and Natural Resources Program and Nidhi R. Santen, Former Associate, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group (ETIP), January 16–30, 2015; Former Project Manager, ETIP, July 2014–January 16, 2015; Former Fellow, ETIP, 2012–2014

The promise, prospects, and public policy trade-offs related to the greater use and production of second-generation biofuels were addressed in an executive session convened by the Harvard Kennedy School on November 13 and 14, 2014. The session attracted more than 25 of the world's leading experts from the fields of policy, science, and business for an intensive two day session. The agenda consisted of three sessions focused on (i) the sustainability of cellulosic supply chains, (ii) government policy options to attract investment and (iii) government policy options to ensure that environmental objectives are met.

 

2014

Wikimedia CC

August 22, 2014

"Could a Climate Change Deal Fit China's Economic Reform Agenda?"

Op-Ed, The Diplomat

By Joern Huenteler, Former Associate, Energy Technology Innovation Policy (ETIP) research group, 2015–2016; Former Research Fellow, ETIP, 2013–2015

"An ambitious deal might also stimulate more demand for innovations in clean technologies, in which China is emerging as a global leader. But because of the UN's decision-making process, in which all its members have to agree on a new deal, Xi Jinping is in the powerful position of being able to commit to only as much emission reductions as fit his domestic policy agenda."

 

 

November 2014

"International Support for Feed-in Tariffs in Developing Countries—A Review and Analysis of Proposed Mechanisms"

Journal Article, Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, volume 39

By Joern Huenteler, Former Associate, Energy Technology Innovation Policy (ETIP) research group, 2015–2016; Former Research Fellow, ETIP, 2013–2015

"Government support in the form of so-called feed-in tariff policies (FITs), which combine long-term, fixed-price electricity purchase agreements and guaranteed grid-access, has attracted large private-sector investments in sustainable electricity generation in the industrialized world. In an effort to replicate these experiences globally, a number of international organizations, NGOs, banks and donor countries are proposing mechanisms to cover part of the cost of FITs in developing countries. This paper reviews these proposals for supported FITs and then uses a case study of Thailand's Alternative Energy Development Plan 2013–2021 to investigate the opportunities and challenges of supporting FITs at a global scale."

 

 

ADwarf Photo

In Press

"The Effect of Local and Global Learning on the Cost of Renewable Energy in Developing Countries"

Journal Article, Journal of Cleaner Production

By Joern Huenteler, Former Associate, Energy Technology Innovation Policy (ETIP) research group, 2015–2016; Former Research Fellow, ETIP, 2013–2015, Christian Niebuhr and Tobias S Schmidt

High upfront costs are a critical barrier for investments in clean infrastructure technologies in developing countries. This paper uses a case study of Thailand's electricity sector to create realistic estimates for the relative contributions of local and global technological learning to reducing these cost in the future and discusses implications of such learnings for international climate policy.

 

 

Herry Lawford Photo

May 14, 2014

"China's Coal Addiction a Threat to Its Energy Security"

Op-Ed, The South China Morning Post

By Joern Huenteler, Former Associate, Energy Technology Innovation Policy (ETIP) research group, 2015–2016; Former Research Fellow, ETIP, 2013–2015

"...[U]ntil now, Beijing's response to unmet energy demand has focused primarily on securing resources overseas, and building infrastructure for imports. China now generates more electricity from imported coal than from nuclear, wind and solar combined. Without a strong, coordinated policy shift, the country will depend on fuel imports for most of its energy consumption by the time it becomes a developed country."

 

 

Aka Photo CC

In Press

"Compulsive Policy-making—The Evolution of the German Feed-in Tariff System for Solar Photovoltaic Power"

Journal Article, Research Policy

By Joern Hoppmann, Former Associate, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, April–August 2013; Former Research Fellow, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, September 2012–March 2013, Joern Huenteler, Former Associate, Energy Technology Innovation Policy (ETIP) research group, 2015–2016; Former Research Fellow, ETIP, 2013–2015 and Bastien Girod

This article shows how complex interdependencies and the uncertain nature of technological change shape the process of targeted policy interventions in socio-technical systems. Toward this end, the authors analyzed the evolution of the German feed-in tariff (FIT) system for solar photovoltaic power, a highly effective and widely copied policy instrument targeted at fostering the diffusion and development of renewable energy technologies.

 
Events Calendar

We host a busy schedule of events throughout the fall, winter and spring. Past guests include: UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, former Vice President Al Gore, and former Soviet Union President Mikhail Gorbachev.